CVE-2020-25681

A flaw was found in dnsmasq before version 2.83. A heap-based buffer overflow was discovered in the way RRSets are sorted before validating with DNSSEC data. An attacker on the network, who can forge DNS replies such as that they are accepted as valid, could use this flaw to cause a buffer overflow with arbitrary data in a heap memory segment, possibly executing code on the machine. The highest threat from this vulnerability is to data confidentiality and integrity as well as system availability.

Read more

CVE-2020-25681

A flaw was found in dnsmasq before version 2.83. A heap-based buffer overflow was discovered in the way RRSets are sorted before validating with DNSSEC data. An attacker on the network, who can forge DNS replies such as that they are accepted as valid, could use this flaw to cause a buffer overflow with arbitrary data in a heap memory segment, possibly executing code on the machine. The highest threat from this vulnerability is to data confidentiality and integrity as well as system availability.

Read more

CVE-2020-25682

A flaw was found in dnsmasq before 2.83. A buffer overflow vulnerability was discovered in the way dnsmasq extract names from DNS packets before validating them with DNSSEC data. An attacker on the network, who can create valid DNS replies, could use this flaw to cause an overflow with arbitrary data in a heap-allocated memory, possibly executing code on the machine. The flaw is in the rfc1035.c:extract_name() function, which writes data to the memory pointed by name assuming MAXDNAME*2 bytes are available in the buffer. However, in some code execution paths, it is possible extract_name() gets passed an offset from the base buffer, thus reducing, in practice, the number of available bytes that can be written in the buffer. The highest threat from this vulnerability is to data confidentiality and integrity as well as system availability.

Read more

CVE-2020-25682

A flaw was found in dnsmasq before 2.83. A buffer overflow vulnerability was discovered in the way dnsmasq extract names from DNS packets before validating them with DNSSEC data. An attacker on the network, who can create valid DNS replies, could use this flaw to cause an overflow with arbitrary data in a heap-allocated memory, possibly executing code on the machine. The flaw is in the rfc1035.c:extract_name() function, which writes data to the memory pointed by name assuming MAXDNAME*2 bytes are available in the buffer. However, in some code execution paths, it is possible extract_name() gets passed an offset from the base buffer, thus reducing, in practice, the number of available bytes that can be written in the buffer. The highest threat from this vulnerability is to data confidentiality and integrity as well as system availability.

Read more

CVE-2020-27216

In Eclipse Jetty versions 1.0 thru 9.4.32.v20200930, 10.0.0.alpha1 thru 10.0.0.beta2, and 11.0.0.alpha1 thru 11.0.0.beta2O, on Unix like systems, the system’s temporary directory is shared between all users on that system. A collocated user can observe the process of creating a temporary sub directory in the shared temporary directory and race to complete the creation of the temporary subdirectory. If the attacker wins the race then they will have read and write permission to the subdirectory used to unpack web applications, including their WEB-INF/lib jar files and JSP files. If any code is ever executed out of this temporary directory, this can lead to a local privilege escalation vulnerability.

Read more

CVE-2020-27216

In Eclipse Jetty versions 1.0 thru 9.4.32.v20200930, 10.0.0.alpha1 thru 10.0.0.beta2, and 11.0.0.alpha1 thru 11.0.0.beta2O, on Unix like systems, the system’s temporary directory is shared between all users on that system. A collocated user can observe the process of creating a temporary sub directory in the shared temporary directory and race to complete the creation of the temporary subdirectory. If the attacker wins the race then they will have read and write permission to the subdirectory used to unpack web applications, including their WEB-INF/lib jar files and JSP files. If any code is ever executed out of this temporary directory, this can lead to a local privilege escalation vulnerability.

Read more

CVE-2020-25681

A flaw was found in dnsmasq before version 2.83. A heap-based buffer overflow was discovered in the way RRSets are sorted before validating with DNSSEC data. An attacker on the network, who can forge DNS replies such as that they are accepted as valid, could use this flaw to cause a buffer overflow with arbitrary data in a heap memory segment, possibly executing code on the machine. The highest threat from this vulnerability is to data confidentiality and integrity as well as system availability.

Read more

CVE-2020-25682

A flaw was found in dnsmasq before 2.83. A buffer overflow vulnerability was discovered in the way dnsmasq extract names from DNS packets before validating them with DNSSEC data. An attacker on the network, who can create valid DNS replies, could use this flaw to cause an overflow with arbitrary data in a heap-allocated memory, possibly executing code on the machine. The flaw is in the rfc1035.c:extract_name() function, which writes data to the memory pointed by name assuming MAXDNAME*2 bytes are available in the buffer. However, in some code execution paths, it is possible extract_name() gets passed an offset from the base buffer, thus reducing, in practice, the number of available bytes that can be written in the buffer. The highest threat from this vulnerability is to data confidentiality and integrity as well as system availability.

Read more

CVE-2020-27216

In Eclipse Jetty versions 1.0 thru 9.4.32.v20200930, 10.0.0.alpha1 thru 10.0.0.beta2, and 11.0.0.alpha1 thru 11.0.0.beta2O, on Unix like systems, the system’s temporary directory is shared between all users on that system. A collocated user can observe the process of creating a temporary sub directory in the shared temporary directory and race to complete the creation of the temporary subdirectory. If the attacker wins the race then they will have read and write permission to the subdirectory used to unpack web applications, including their WEB-INF/lib jar files and JSP files. If any code is ever executed out of this temporary directory, this can lead to a local privilege escalation vulnerability.

Read more