Scammers Employ ‘Vishing’ Technique to Steal Personal Details of Online Shoppers

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Scammers are using a unique methodology called ‘vishing’ to trick online customers. In a vishing attack, the fraudster impersonates someone from Amazon but uses a phone call as the weapon of choice. Another tactic employed by the cybercriminal is via email with a contact number and requesting the receiver to call that number. 

Recently, cybersecurity firm Armorblox discovered two distinct email campaigns posing as Amazon. Both emails were identical with a similar Amazon branding and followed a pattern similar to real order confirmation emails from Amazon but, if one knows where to look, there are many indications that the emails are fraudulent.

The first indication is that the emails are sent from a Gmail address or one that looks like it “might” belong to Amazon ([email protected][.]com) and the recipient is not addressed by their name (a piece of information Amazon would know).

Armorblox researchers noted that scammers are not using the old taction of including a malicious attachment or URL / link, which allowed them to bypass any detection controls that block known bad links. They also made other choices that allowed them to slip past any deterministic filters or blocklists that check for brand names being impersonated (e.g., by writing AMAZ0N – with a zero instead of an “O”). 

What you can do to prevent yourself from these fraudulent schemes? 

With online shopping becoming the new normal, fraudsters will continue targeting this global and immense pool of potential victims. Scammers are using a combination of social engineering, brand imitation, and emotive trigger to lure victims into their trap. If successful, victims could end up handing over their personal data and credit card details, leading to consequences such as identity theft or fraudulent payments made on their behalf. 

The first thing you have to learn is not to open attachments and follow links from unknown emails, and not to call on included phone numbers which may cost you thousands of rupees. If you’re worried that you might be billed for an order you did not make, go to the shop’s website and find the correct phone number yourself.

Secondly, do not share your personal details on a phone call. If you feel the urgency to call back, don’t contact the person through any phone number listed in the message. Instead, run a search for a publicly available number for the company.

Lastly, but most importantly use multi-factor authentication (MFA) on all accounts and for all sites. Don’t use the same password across multiple accounts and use a password manager to store your passwords.

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